Why you should carry a camera with you

“Sometimes we see things we wish we hadn’t while showing a house, and other times we are glad we did.”

So states my co-worker Sarah, who was showing a house over the weekend and came upon this scene unexpectedly.

So I learned something new today:  Fawns are born without a scent, so if they remain still, they do not attract the attention of predators.  A mother deer often leaves her fawn for long periods of time, also not to draw a predator to the baby.  She will leave her young alone and feed elsewhere, only returning for brief periods at dusk and dawn to feed the fawn.  The mother may leave the fawn in the same location for a few days, especially if it is a newborn, until it is strong enough to move with her.

This is why you sometimes hear of a fawn being discovered in the oddest place … on someone’s front porch, for instance.  The baby is safer alone than it would be with its mother.  The mother will not reject the fawn due to human scent, but it is best not to touch it.  Sarah only took photos, noticed the fawn did not seem at all afraid, and it had blue eyes!

Thank you, Sarah, for sharing the photo!

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5 responses to “Why you should carry a camera with you

  1. What a beautiful and adorable little fawn! Thanks for sharing with us and putting a big smile on my face! 🙂

  2. What a beautiful little creature! And I’m amazed it had blue eyes….

  3. Oooooh so sweet. Lucky Sarah…

  4. Amazing …I never knew that, and I’ve seen many fawns over the years. Thx, D

  5. OHHHHH how cute. I never knew that either! We are never too old to
    learn!! 🙂

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