Feeding the hungry

This story is from several years ago, but it seems relevant – it falls into the category of what not to do when you live in rural New Hampshire. Or probably anywhere else, for that matter. I enjoy feeding the birds and the squirrels here, and you can only put bird seed out in the winter – between November 1 and April 1, generally – because otherwise the bears will get it (will come right into your house to get it, if necessary, but that’s another story). So this particular year I resurrected a feeder we’d used on the island, and set it on a post near the kitchen door where I could be sure to watch the critter activity. In the days and weeks that followed the bird seed disappeared at a rapid rate – I figured it must be the squirrels, and we’d have the fattest squirrels in Carroll County. Nevertheless, I kept buying bird seed. And it kept disappearing, sometimes it seemed almost overnight. Then one night, as I was getting ready to go to bed, I looked out the bedroom window, under the light of a full moon, and thought I saw movement out there – near the bird feeder. I turned off the lights in the room, looked closer, and saw …. deer at the feeder, slurping the seeds out as fast as they could! It only made sense – I’d conveniently placed the feeder right at deer-height, and they must have figured it was there just for them! So the mystery was solved, I cut back on the amount of bird seed I bought … but I still filled the feeder often enough to get some pictures. Check out the guy in the last photo, licking his lips in delight at the smorgasbord set out in the dead of winter!

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2 responses to “Feeding the hungry

  1. Wonderful pictures of the deer! And how kind of you to feed them. They must be starving in that kind of temperature. Maybe you should put out a rhodie, or something…

  2. Great shots of the little old “fluff faces”.
    I wondered how our feeder kept emptying out so quickly also.
    Then we had some snow, and I saw the tracks.
    Actually got some pixs later….but not near as good as yours!

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